anacahuita
Cordia boissieri

Secondary Names:
anacahuite, Mexican-olive, wild olive


Leaf Type: Evergreen
Texas Native:
Firewise:
anacahuite150.jpg
Tree Description:

A small tree with a curving trunk, to 20 feet tall and a trunk to 12" in diameter, with a low, rounded crown.

Range/Site Description:

Native to the brushlands and forest remnants of the southernmost tip of Texas, this species is a beautiful landscape tree that can be planted as far north as San Antonio.

Leaf:

Simple, opposite on the twigs, oval to oblong, 4" to 5" long by 2" to 3" wide, leaf edge without teeth, velvety on both surfaces, evergreen.

Flower:

Very showy, white, trumpet-shaped flowers, 1.5" long and 2" wide, with a yellow spot in the throat, appear throughout spring and summer with sufficient water.

Fruit:

A whitish drupe, about 1" long, with sweet, pulpy flesh. Favored by wildlife and edible by humans.

Bark:

Gray to light brown, strongly fissured with flat ridges even on small stems, fibrous and interwoven.

Wood:

Wood is sometimes used for woodenware and yokes. Sold principally as a landscape tree.

Similar Species:

Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) has smooth leaves 3" to 8" long; white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus) occurs in East Texas and has smooth leaves.

Interesting Facts:

Jelly made from the fruits is used as a household remedy for coughs and colds.

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